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When the COVID-19 pandemic reached the U.S. in 2020, the public health crisis was accompanied by an economic disaster as well. For many, one of the biggest worries was housing, with homeowners concerned about falling behind on mortgage payments.

While the median annual wage for full-time working moms is $45,000 nationally, moms in some cities and states earn significantly more or less.

Electricians can enter the field without four-year degrees and can instead opt for a less expensive trade school education or an apprenticeship that allows them to earn while they hone their skills. 

While residents in the northern U.S. typically enjoy comfortably warm temperatures, Americans in other parts of the country increasingly face months of extreme heat and other severe weather events.

While drivers have been spending less time on the roads over the past year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, preliminary data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration suggests that 2020 saw an uptick in traffic fatalities.

For many, the view of a typical renter is a young person. Yet, over the last two decades, the data shows that many older Americans are forgoing homeownership in favor of shorter-term living arrangements in the rental market.

The science on sleep is clear: sleep deprivation is associated with a variety of other health concerns. Despite the importance of good sleep, a large number of U.S. residents do not report getting the rest they need each night. 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 saw a surging demand for single-family rentals. This emerging preference for single-family rental units will strain some rental markets more than others.

The freedom to venture out in search of opportunity has been a lasting American idea. And yet now, in the modern era, data shows that movement in the U.S. has been steadily declining for nearly four decades.

Despite the current COVID-19 recession and the initial drop in home sales, the national housing market expanded significantly in 2020.

Aging Baby Boomers and declining fertility rates mean that for the first time in the country’s history, older people—those 65 years and older—are projected to outnumber children by 2030. 

While the COVID-19 pandemic has been devastating for many businesses and workers, it has led to greater flexibility for workers in some industries. 

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The severe weather events of 2020 are part of a larger trend—the frequency of extreme weather conditions in the U.S. is on the rise as climate change accelerates.

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