L2 for Kids holding fundraiser as school year approaches

Volunteers with L2 for Kids posed for a photo with employees from Walmart in Lexington in 2017 when 300 children had new clothes bought for them.

LEXINGTON — A new outfit can make anyone feel more confident or successful, this is can be especially true for school students. If they are ashamed of what they have to wear can be detrimental to their own self-respect. There is a non-profit in Lexington which is dedicated to getting new clothes for children who may have never worn anything brand new in their life.

L2 for Kids is holding a fundraiser this month to raise money to clothe these children for success when they begin the next school year in August.

Started in 2012 by Henry and Pat Potter, L2 has helped over 3,400 children in communities such as Alma, Cambridge, Cozad, Culbertson, Grant, Gothenburg, Holdrege, Lexington, North Platte and McCook.

Over the years the numbers of children helped have only increased, in 2014 there were 437 helped, in 2015, it grew to 680, 2016 saw it grow to 778, in 2017, 953 and in 2018, around 11,000.

“L2 stands for Lazarus in the Bible who was given a second chance. Like Lazarus, children have a second chance with new school clothes for the first day of school,” according to the L2 website, “With the help of local churches, counselors, and school personnel, applications will be given to the parents of children needing school clothes.”

Their mission statement reads in part, “L2 for Kids is striving to give all children the opportunity to hold their head up high and gain self-confidence. Children who feel good about themselves and their appearance exude confidence, which promotes success and accomplishment.”

“Children selected to receive clothing in the L2 for Kids program shop with a parent and our volunteers to choose clothing they want and need. The only guidelines are the clothes must be school appropriate and sticking within a budget,” according to the L2 web site.

Buying full brand new outfits for children costs money, between $75 and $125 is allowed to each child as they pick out their clothing.

To help fund this, L2 is holding a pork or smoked rib fundraiser. Each rack of ribs is $25 each, there is a buy four get one free deal. Order forms are available at the L2 website, www.l2forkids or call Henry or Pat Potter at 308-530-0441 or 308-520-1104.

Pickup for the ribs will take place Saturday, July 27 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, July 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. Ann’s Catholic Church parking lot at 6th and Jackson St.

A percentage of the sales will go toward L2 and help them purchase new school clothes. Individuals can designate which community they want their donations to go toward.

There are other ways to donate to L2, gifts given to the church with a designation of L2 for Kids will ensure the funds get deposited in the account for the specific town from where the gift has been given. This helps ensure the money stays to help children in the local community. Money can also be mailed to Harry Potter at 76311 Rd. 416 Willow Island, Ne, 69171.

A second way is to give a trust which was created for L-2. The interest and dividends from the trust as used as a supplement to the giving going on in different communities, according to information from L2 the idea behind the trust is to eventual fund purchases without always having to fundraise.

The final way is to leave a legacy gift which will last several generations providing help to children for several years. These types of gifts can be made through a will or trust.

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